Flossie S. G. Chua is a research and project manager at Project Zero-Harvard University. She works on multiple projects in the USA as well as different parts of the world that look at how we might prepare young people to live, work and play in the complex and dynamic 21st century. Her projects involve exploring and documenting emerging practices of progressive pedagogies focused on 21st century learning and the shared leadership structures in schools that support it, as well as collaborations that study and design structures and pedagogies that support young people to grapple productively and insightfully with complexity and ambiguity. Flossie has worked on projects with the International Baccalaureate to document best practices in interdisciplinary teaching, learning and assessment, and developed practical frameworks and tools to guide quality interdisciplinary research and education for the Middle Year and Diploma Year programmes; with the Independent Schools in Victoria--Melbourne to research innovative 21st century learning frameworks and school models; with the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) to understand the markers and conditions for successful interdisciplinary collaborations at institutions such as CIFAR, the MacArthur Foundation and the Santa Fe Institute; with the Portland Public Schools on the World in Portland project to support leaders and K-12 teachers to build on existing practices that develop students' global competence and deepen their understanding across disciplines; with the THINK Global School to advance a series of adaptable micro-teaching interventions - global thinking routines - geared towards developing students’ global competence and consciousness; and with support from the Longview Foundation to study signature pedagogies in global competence education at the elementary and middle school level through close analysis of exemplary teachers’ practice. In addition, she is the interdisciplinary specialist with ART21 Educators, a nonprofit designed to support K-12 teachers to bring contemporary art, artists, and themes into classroom teaching and learning, and broaden their curricular focus to include inquiry into contemporary issues and questions that demand cross-curricular knowledge and ways of thinking through contemporary art. Flossie holds an Ed.D from Harvard University, and is also an Instructor in Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.